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Growing old and living well.

17 Oct 2017

Everyone is getting old!

Dawn French is 60.

The Queen is 91.

Maculay Culkin is 37.

And today, you could be arrested by someone born the same year Wannabe was released by the Spice Girls.

We’re all ageing.

In the UK today, there are over 11.8 million people aged over 65 with 1.6 million over 85 years old. The predictions are that by 2040 nearly a quarter of the population will be over 65. It seems we are living longer and with that comes the potential for increasing health needs.

In our recent animation we celebrated the International Day of Older People.

On the 1st October 2017 the United Nations theme was Stepping into the Future: Tapping the Talents, Contributions and Participation of Older Persons in Society.

The UN’s aim was to explore the participation of older persons in various aspects of social, cultural, economic and political life. In our short animation, we followed the lives of Max and Phyllis.

In 1955, Phyllis is a 19-year-old art student with a flair for dancing at the weekends. It is also the year baby Max is born, who grows into a young man with a passion for football.

With the blink of an eye, Phyllis glides through being knee deep in children and her thirties, to find herself in her fifties. Her children have grown and flown the nest, leaving her teaching at the local art college and still dancing at the weekends with her husband.

When Max becomes a father, his footballing dreams are lived out through his daughter who plays for his favourite premiership club. Yet his favourite place remains the football pitch where now he spends his time shouting from the side-lines.

After tragedy hits the lives of Max and Phyllis, they both find themselves in need of twenty-four-hour care.

Because we love happy endings at Simple Stuff Works, Phyllis and Max receive excellent support in hospital and a residential home. Phyllis is assessed and sits every day in a good chair.

A chair not too shallow, too wide, too deep, too short or too high.

Like Goldilock’s chair, it is just right.

And after years away from painting, Phyllis picks up her brushes again and finds a long-lost part of herself. Having the right postural care support means she can create and participate. She can contribute to her local environment and be who she is.

For Max, a long period of rehabilitation follows a stroke. But thankfully, medical staff know that his sleep position affects his ability to sit and be active. So, with help from the multi-disciplinary team, Max’s night time positioning is comfortable, symmetrical and safe.

And for Max, having high care needs, does not stop him from showing up at the football pitch to coach the local girls’ team. Because with imagination and dedicated team work, every person can be who they are, contribute to society and live a life that reflects their own story with their unique skills.

The story of Phyllis and Max is fictional, but here at Simple Stuff Works we know many Phyllis and Max’s whose lives are transformed with good postural care. That is why we are so passionate about what we do.

Real life Phyllis’s get to continue their hobbies because of good seating.

Real life Max’s get to participate in their community because of a good sleep system.

In the coming months, we hope to share some of these stories with you. Tales of real people and real lives that have been touched and changed by Simple Stuff Sleep Systems and good 24-hour postural care.

Rachel is a nurse, author and mum living in Essex with her husband and three sons. Her life changed the day her eldest son was born and introduced her to the world of severe disability and life-limiting epilepsy. As well as doing laundry and picking up Lego, she blogs at Born at the Right Time and published her memoir ‘The Skies I’m Under’. Rachel is passionate about sharing her family’s story to improve the care of complex families. Her speaking engagements include leading workshops with parents as well as training professionals.